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Osmanthorpe

Type : WoodlandNewark

Osmanthorpe

This reserve came to the Trust in 2001 as the result of a legacy. It is a long, narrow, almost triangular site which was formerly an orchard. Located at SK677568 on the minor road from Kirklington to Southwell the reserve is adjacent to Osmanthorpe Manor.

About the Reserve

The original orchard was planted with apple, plum and pear trees although the pears have long gone from the site. Although past their peak, many of the apple trees are very old examples of mainly Bramley’s Seedling and there is a chance that they could be amongst the first Bramley trees planted. There are a small number of other varieties including Cox’s which have been planted more recently.

There is a small area of grassland near the entrance. The site boundaries are marked by a ditch and a mature hedgerow which includes a mature alder and some plum trees. A number of derelict buildings were acquired with the land.

Please click on this link for more pictures of the reserve from our flickr set 

Conservation Management

Scrub clearance, tree pruning, hedgerow management are all key elements of maintaining and improving this site. One of the main objectives is to increase the productivity of the orchard. A timber framed barn has been constructed to provide shelter for educational visits.

How to Get There

The site lies immediately west of Osmanthorpe Manor and is most easily accessed by taking the Southwell Road from the A617 in the village of Kirklington and the reserve is on the left just before the right turn to Halam. If you are using satnav, enter NG22 8NJ and follow the preceding instructions.

Why not visit these nearby reserves? Duke's Wood & Mansey Common.

Further Information

If you would like further details about the reserve, or if you are interested in getting involved in the management of the site, please call the Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust Office on 0115 958 8242

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