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Rushcliffe Nature Conservation Forums’ vision for local wildlife

Wednesday 16th December

Rushcliffe Nature Conservation Forums’ vision for local wildlife

Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust, in conjunction with Rushcliffe Borough Council are looking forward in 2016 to the implementation of the third edition of the Rushcliffe Nature Conservation Strategy, setting the vision for Rushcliffe’s wildlife for the period up to 2020.

On 10th October 2015, Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust, in conjunction with Rushcliffe Borough Council and on behalf of the Rushcliffe Nature Conservation Strategy Implementation Group (RNCSIG), held the second Rushcliffe Nature Conservation Forum at East Leake village hall.

Ben Driver, Southern Conservation Officer at Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust said “The event was very successful and attended by over 30 people from various Friends Groups across the Rushcliffe Borough”.

The morning consisted of talks and presentations, covering a wide range of topics. A member of the Nottinghamshire County Council Archaeology Team opened with a talk on spotting archaeology on your site, with a case study based on East Leake’s own Meadow Park.

Informative and interesting talks were also provided by Amphibians and Reptile Conservation Trust, Nottinghamshire Bat Group and the Rushcliffe Barn Owl Project and several friends groups gave presentations on their recent activities. 

The event saw the launch of the third edition of the Rushcliffe Nature Conservation Strategy, setting the vision for Rushcliffe’s wildlife for the period up to 2020.  The strategy can be accessed from the Rushcliffe Borough Council Web Site. The current version of the strategy has an increased focused on landscape scale nature conservation in Rushcliffe which fits well with The Wildlife Trust’s own Living Landscapes concept.

After lunch, Friends of Meadow Park kindly led a walk around their site. Although the wildflower meadows were cut several weeks prior to the forum, there was plenty to see on this former farmland site, which now comprises an impressive mix of wildflower meadow, woodland and hedges alongside the Kingston Brook.

Copies of the talks can now be accessed from the RNCSIG document store and you can keep up-to-date on RNCSIG activities by joining their Facebook page.

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