Footage of urban otters proves that the once threatened creature is making a return to the City | News | Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust
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Footage of urban otters proves that the once threatened creature is making a return to the City

Wednesday 3rd August

Footage of urban otters proves that the once threatened creature is making a return to the City

Video footage, captured by local wildlife photographer Jack Perks, has finally proved what wildlife conservationists have long believed – that otters, so long absent from our county, are back on the River Trent and its tributaries close to Nottingham.

A report of an otter killed on the road at Burton Joyce at the turn of the year illustrated just how close they were to the city, but video footage captured by Jack Perks of Clifton using remote ‘trip’ cams, conclusively proves that they are present within the City boundary.

Speaking about the footage Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust’s Head of Communications Erin McDaid said: “This is really exciting. We’ve known for a number of years that otters must be passing along the Trent and even through the City as they’ve recolonised parts of the county and other tributaries of the Trent, but to have footage of them within the City boundary is wonderful.”

Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust has been working to help otters return to their former haunts since the late 1990s and regularly finds signs of otters at its Attenborough Nature Reserve alongside the Trent upstream of the City.

Mr McDaid continued “Otters have been making a slow comeback in Nottinghamshire, having become extinct in the county in the 1970s. For decades people associated them with wild places such as Scotland, but they are now back on all the major rivers in England that they once occupied. This is a great conservation story and proves that we can help bring species back from the brink and could even be spotted in the City.” 

The footage of the otter can be seen here.

Have you spotted an otter?

Otters may occasionally be confused with the much smaller mink -  a non-native species which is found along many of the county’s waterways.  Otters are much bigger and have brown fur which is paler underneath, have a long tapering tail and a large flat head.  The mink is dark brown, occasionally almost black, all over, has a short fluffy tail and a much more pointed head.  The return of the otter in recent years has begun to reduce the impact of the mink on our native wildlife, especially the water vole, and mink are displaced by the much larger otter.

Records of otters and other mammals should be reported at www.nottsmammals.org.uk/

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