Trailblazing habitat creation and restoration work funded by Severn Trent Water making a real difference

A range of exciting habitat projects, being delivered by Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust with funding support from Severn Trent Water and the Environment Agency highlighted by Natural England Chairman Tony Juniper as demonstrating the partnership approach needed to create a flourishing Nature Recovery Network, have made great progress despite the challenges of lockdowns.
EA visit with Janice Bradley

Teams from the Wildlife Trust, Severn Trent Water & the Environment Agency recently visited the Idle Washlands and Idle Valley Nature Reserve in north Nottinghamshire to view the progress made with efforts to boost habitat for species including water voles and wading birds and to reintroduce beavers to the county for the first time in 400 years.

The projects form part of a major programme being delivered by the partners which also includes work with farmers and landowners to improve habitats for wildlife on their land as well as efforts to conserve soils and minimise pollution in vital water courses.

During a visit to view the projects last year Tony Juniper welcomed the work as a major contribution to the Nature Recovery Network and called on other companies to follow suit.

The recent site visit include a new area of wetland habitat, including feeding areas for wading birds at Gringley-on-the-Hill and Idle Valley Nature Reserve where the Wildlife Trust is currently creating one of the largest beaver enclosures in England in preparation for a planned re-introduction of the native mammals later this year.

Speaking about the projects Senior Conservation Officer Mark Speck said: “It is so exciting to have the funding support and backing of partners such as Severn Trent Water & the Environment Agency to enable us to make real progress with much needed habitat creation and restoration across the Idle Valley. Whilst many people will be aware of our work at Idle Valley Nature Reserve at the southern end of the Valley fewer people know the extent of our work across the valley working with a range of landowners on a range of exciting projects to benefits species including the threatened water vole and wading birds such as lapwing and redshank. The Idle Valley is a hugely important haven for wildlife and we’re delighted to be able to invest in new habitats to support nature’s recovery.”

Whilst many people will be aware of our work at Idle Valley Nature Reserve at the southern end of the Valley fewer people know the extent of our work across the valley working with a range of landowners on a range of exciting projects to benefits species
Mark Speck, Senior Conservation Officer
Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust

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The Idle Valley Nature Reserve is the Trusts largest, so working along side neighbouring landowners is vital in the ambition to achieve a Nature Recovery Network.

Idle Valley Nature Reserve